Government approves wetland bulldozing based on environmental study of wrong lot

While the development is planned for both Carters and Skipper's, the environmental study was done on Skippers, a bare patch of earth.

While the development is planned for both Carters and Skipper’s, the environmental study was done on Skippers, a bare patch of earth.

Approvals for a controversial development at an ecologically significant site in Bayswater were based on incomplete environmental assessments, documents have revealed.

Read more at WAtoday.

Mt Lawley ‘church steeple’ tree felled for private development

A local's hopeless protest.  Photo: Supplied

A local’s hopeless protest. Photo: Supplied

A towering Mt Lawley tree described by the local heritage society as a ‘church steeple’ in the landscape has got the chop, as its trunk grew slightly over the council boundary and on to a private development site.

Read more at WAtoday.

 

‘Blinding lasers in rock wallabies’ faces!’ scientist urges tourist boycott

 

Mr Carter wants the event shifted - if not, boycotted.  Photo: Mark Carter

“Rock wallabies have young in their pouches and some are carrying embryos. It is well known that if these animals get distressed they can eject joeys from the pouch and the risk of death for those is high.” Photo: Mark Carter

 

A tourist show shooting industrial-strength laser beams into a stretch of cliffs in the Northern Territory is an act of animal cruelty that will inflict distress, and potentially physical damage, on endangered wallabies, a local scientist says.

Read more at WAtoday.

‘This is not about parental rights or doctors…it’s about Oshin Kiszko’

A Western Australian Family Court judge, who was faced with a grave decision in a state-first case this week, has spoken of how his decision could only ever have been about the life of one boy.

Justice Richard O’Brien was tasked with handing down a landmark decision on whether Perth six-year-old Oshin Kiszko should receive radiotherapy treatment for brain cancer against his parents’ wishes.

Read more at WAtoday

Suspend your disbelief for new Netflix doco, Tony Robbins: I Am Not Your Guru

Tony Robbins: I am Not Your Guru

Tony Robbins: I am Not Your Guru

Every year 2500 people from 71 countries come to Tony Robbins’ Date With Destiny seminar in Florida.

The word seminar seems a little inadequate. It’s $5000 a ticket for six 12-hour days in which Robbins speaks and performs ‘interventions’ for audience members. Attendees also attend intensive group therapy  sessions to confront their demons, build relationships and eventually create strategies to take their ‘breakthroughs’ into the future.

Robbins was someone I had previously thought of as a fat old white dude who writes self help books for a living, but turns out to be a relatively young, foul-mouthed and funny behemoth of a man who looks like Jack Reacher and burns with an almost evangelical passion to help people, a passion that arose from the ashes of a troubled childhood.

His brand of ‘intervention’ is a technique he calls ‘practical psychology’, a unique blend of performance and personal connection in which people (like deer in headlights) tell him darkets secrets in front of a crowd of thousands. He doesn’t know the outcome of these conversations at the outset, but under the pressure of the spotlight he questions them closely, pays close attention to body language and every time, leads them to catharsis, usually using a heady blend of humour and tough love.

Tony Robbins: I am Not Your Guru. Photo credit: Courtesy of Third Eye Motion Picture Company/Netflix

Tony Robbins: I am Not Your Guru. Photo credit: Courtesy of Third Eye Motion Picture Company/Netflix

This sounds terribly weird, even grotesque, but it’s fascinating. His huge team of staff (the coordination  of this event is a wonder in itself) who run the groups identify from extensive questionnaires the ‘red flags’, or most damaged attendees, those at risk of self-harm or worse, and keep a close eye on them, as does Robbins himself, throughout the process.

I’m a noted sook, but I defy you not to cry at seeing people, who in some cases have faced unimaginable trauma, finding hope in a place they thought of as a last chance at life. It’s also an insight into a man who the phrase ‘larger than life’ was probably written for.

This is the first time in the event’s 25-year history that Robbins has let media in and the result is this remarkable documentary by Oscar-nominated filmmaker Joe Berlinger (Brother’s Keeper, Metallica: Some Kind of Monster, the Paradise Lost triology).

Robbins said in a recent long-form podcast interview (worth a look itself) that after the premiere he got a letter from Michael Moore, telling him that watching it left him both a better man and a better filmmaker.

Suspend your disbelief and check it out – at the very least, it’s grand spectacle, but for many it’s redemption.