The Beguiled, or ‘women making movies from books by men about women.’

After watching The Virgin Suicides I wanted more books by Jeffrey Eugenides and more films by Sofia Coppola.

I now have a copy of Eugenides’ The Marriage Plot, but that’s on a ridiculously big to-read pile, so more on that later. Quicker gratification was had through renting Sofia Coppola’s The Beguiled, a Southern gothic set in rural Mississippi during the American Civil War.

Released last year, it has a high-powered cast; Nicole Kidman and Kirsten Dunst play two hot but buttoned-up schoolmarms looking after a few stranded students (including Elle Fanning, Australia’s Angourie Rice, from Jasper Jones) all walled up in their seminary on the edge of a forest waiting out the war.

One of the younger girls comes across a wounded enemy soldier in the forest and her teachers decide not to turn him in and to tend his wounds and let him recover his health within their four walls instead.

But nobody reckons on the hotbed of lust that can become of a bunch of beautiful women of varying age locked up with a charmingly helpless (but growing stronger every day) Colin Farrell. In short you don’t know who needs protecting more, him or them, and that scenario keeps changing over the course of the movie.

It has the Coppola cinematography I craved. The outdoor shots, particularly, of the massive trees dripping with Spanish moss, dwarfing the human story playing out beneath them, somehow frame the whole story, emphasising their isolation and heightening the sense of dreamy beauty. And the intimate shots of the women and their faces make for another sensitive portrayal of human beauty, emotion and desire.

The narrative has plenty of suspense, fuelled by a sense of imminent danger and disaster, and controlled, nuanced performances from the actors. The ending, when it comes, is melancholic and subdued. I didn’t mind that too much, but Charlie, who I watched it with, was disappointed, having hoped for something a bit more dramatic. The Ministry probably would have hated the ending.

Interestingly, like The Virgin Suicides, this was a female director making a movie from a book about female power and sexuality, that was originally written by a male author.

I wonder in circumstances like these about the multiple acts of creative perception and imagination that led to what I finally see onscreen, especially since it’s finally coloured by me, the person watching it.

It’s not haunting like The Virgin Suicides, and probably isn’t something you’d watch twice. But I would be interested to see the 1971 version (starring Clint Eastwood) and definitely recommend watching this, to anyone interested in contemporary cinema. You won’t be bored, unless you’re exclusively into Marvel movies.

Speaking of which, I’ve just seen this trailer for Venom. I don’t generally think much of Marvel movies (X-Men and other exceptions aside) but the blurb from its PR people called it “one of Marvel’s most complex characters”, and the preview looked cool (until 1.20 when I stopped watching, as I do in all trailers now). Now I’m dithering over whether to go see it. Anyone excited about this?

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New Anna Kendrick, new Perth CBD cinema!

Anna Kendrick is in a new movie and I love Anna Kendrick and the movie looks good too. Did I mention I love Anna Kendrick?

This is playing this weekend at Raine Square’s new Palace Cinema, along with a bunch of other goodlooking movies including Christopher Robin, Custody, Searching and You Were Never Really Here. And all the tickets are $10 until sold out. And there’s $5 glasses of prosecco, if I recall.

So if you want to check out the apparently very swanky new cinema, now is the time.

The Virgin Suicides: well worth another watch

Re-watched The Virgin Suicides for the first time in many years.

Just craved a movie that meant something. You know?

It was heartachingly beautiful. All the girls, particularly (of course) Kirsten Dunst, but also those coltish teenage boys. Sofia Coppola did such an incredible job, visually, with all that dreamy use of colour. But also with the scripting. She obviously drew directly on the book for a lot of that narration.

Like this bit.

“What lingered after them was not life, which always overcomes natural death, but the most trivial list of mundane facts: a clock ticking on a wall, a room dim at noon, and the outrageousness of a human being thinking only of herself.”

 

Strikes like an arrow, doesn’t it.

I haven’t actually read the book, but I recognised Eugenides’ language from having read the excellent family saga Middlesex which he wrote 10 years later (I’m sure if I wrote The Virgin Suicides I’d want a decade’s rest afterwards as well).

I’m now motivated to chase down a copy of The Virgin Suicides and read it. I am pretty sure the film’s nailed it, but I just want more of that Eugenides word magic.

Also, I want more Sofia Coppola-directed movies. I’m reminded to seek out The Beguiled, which came out last year but I forgot to go see, and 2006’s Marie Antoinette (both with Kirsten Dunst. Must be her muse). Anyone seen either of these? I’m taking recommendations.

Kid on bike with space gun: coming soon to a movie theatre near you

So Stranger Things alerted the movie world to the fact that people like me will watch anything with a poster that looks like this. Accordingly, they have made a movie and released a poster that looks like this and accordingly, I am excited.
It’s from the producers of Stranger Things.

And Arrival, which I just realised I haven’t seen. This will be rectified.

It also contains Dennis Quaid and James Franco, kids on bikes and space guns. That’s all I need to know, but if you need more, here’s the blurb…

“A pulse-pounding crime thriller with a sci-fi twist from the producers of Stranger Things and ARRIVAL, KIN is the story of an unexpected hero destined for greatness. Chased by a vengeful criminal and a gang of otherworldly soldiers, a recently released ex-con and his adopted teenage brother are forced to go on the run after finding a futuristic super-weapon of mysterious origin as their only protection.”

They have released a trailer that suffers from that modern-day bane of being more than double the length it should be. So I warn you, stop watching after 1.20.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hereditary

Went to Girls School Cinema in East Perth to see Hereditary on Sunday night. I had missed it at the mainstream movies but I’d heard it should be seen on the big screen if possible.

It’s the story of a family – Annie (Toni Collette), Steve (Gabriel Byrne), their son Peter (Alex Wolff) and daughter Charlie (Milly Shapiro). The death of Annie’s mother begins a series of grisly and disturbing events that leads her to the heart of a generations-old mystery.

I’d psyched myself up, because I had seen the trailer, which made it look like a combination of every fucked-up horror movie you’re ever seen, times 10. Amusingly, if you haven’t heard, at Event Cinemas they mistakenly played it during the previews for Peter Rabbit, totally freaking out a bunch of children and their mums (probably mainly the mums).

And I’d heard from my friend Sigrid, who is intimately acquainted with horror cinema, that it was one of the most disturbing movies she’d ever seen either. So, grimly prepared, I only let out one terrified mewling noise during the entire thing, which I was rather proud of.

The Ministry of course let out muffled snorts of laughter throughout, which we know was only his male pride deciding to view awful things as funny in order to protect himself emotionally. Right?

Because probably what was worst about this movie was its raw depiction of loss and grief and the terrible dynamics that can fester within families. It’s the combination of that with the intense horror scenes that made it so unusually confronting a movie.

All the performances were excellent, particularly Alex Wolff as the guilty, fearful and confused teenager Peter, but Collette was the obvious standout. She should win an Oscar for that performance. Her pain was awful to behold. It just remains to be seen whether an Oscar could go to a performance in a genre film.

It should! This is a smart genre film, with a dense plot. I’ve decided the use of the miniatures Collette’s character is crafting is just to keep you guessing and kind of freaked out by them (alternative theories welcome in the comments). But there were other elements of the storyline that didn’t seem to make sense, or that we thought were maybe just included for gratuitous horror purposes. We had to Google them before going, “ooooohhhhhh” and concluding that yes, it all made sense. It makes a nice change when a movie makes you work for it just a little.

This is required viewing for horror fans and Collette devotees. I fit both categories and so I’m glad I got to see it on the big screen for the full effect. It was an excellent film. But if you’re not in either category, maybe give yourself a break and pick something funny instead.

 

 

 

 

 

The Equalizer II

Saw this on Friday night. For the uninitiated, it’s basically hyper-violence in which Denzel Washington plays a CIA agent turned vigilante.

The Ministry calls it Black Jack Reacher.

The movies follow a 1980s TV show. I haven’t seen that, but I really liked the first The Equalizer movie, which broke new creative ground in its depiction of Denzel mentally calculating his fight sequences.

Denzel Washington turns everything he touches to gold, and this sequel is no exception, but it’s been turned into a straight-up action thriller, without the nuance of the first. But hey, what’s not to love about a straight-up action thriller, with Denzel Washington subjecting bad people to toe-curling, knuckle-biting levels of violence? 

Special mentions:

  1. A woman gives as good as she gets in a vaguely realistic fight scene. Rare.
  2. A commendable lack of car chases.

 

New trailer for Fantastic Beasts: Crimes of Grindelwald is out

I overuse exclamation marks. That is the only reason why I have not added ten exclamation marks to this headline. Be assured, I am thinking them.

To me, this looks like it’s going to be way better than the first Fantastic Beasts. Maybe I just like maximum mayhem.