Eight years to write a plan, as battles build to war for Perth bush

Hundreds, if not thousands, of emails have poured into my inbox over recent years from distressed residents begging me to help them save this or that bit of bushland. Not a week goes by without another one.

Battles have raged in Shenton Park, Midvale, Bayswater, Trigg, Cockburn, Kenwick and Ascot, to mention just a handful, and together these battles represent a war.

Just a few of the protests in Perth over the past couple of years.
Just a few of the protests in Perth over the past couple of years.

People are worried and depressed about the state of the biodiversity that has always been Perth’s genuine claim to fame.

And anyone who’s ever tried to deal with the Perth’s environmental approvals and planning system, whether trying to clear bushland or protect it, finds an intimidating maze that makes little sense even to the agencies that are part of it.

No one really knows how important each patch of bush is in a city-wide sense. Developers can proceed with the assumption that if they cut this bit down, someone else will save another patch, somewhere… just not in their backyard.

Yet after eight years of work on it, the McGowan government has suspended work on one of the state’s biggest planning documents, the one that might have fixed this mess once and for all.

Read the rest of this story here on WAtoday

Buried audit shows WA species plunging into extinction

Five endangered West Australian species have become extinct in the wild, three threatened ecological communities have been destroyed and the fate of at least 41 other species is unknown after no monitoring was done for more than a decade, shows a costly state government audit that was promptly buried without any trends being made public.

WA relies on its biodiversity as a major tourism drawcard.

WA relies on its biodiversity as a major tourism drawcard.

The audit into the state’s threatened species lists indicated much of WA’s biodiversity was “rapidly heading towards extinction in the next 10 years” and management was having limited impact, a biodiversity expert and former senior public servant with extensive inside knowledge told WAtoday. 

It is unknown whether the audit’s results were buried without any final reports being written or made public as intended, but one explanation is that the trends, if viewed overall, were simply too alarming.

Another is that severe public service cuts prevented the finalisation of the report, with WAtoday being told the audit team was dissolved straight after the information gathering was complete and several members were made redundant.

Read more at WAtoday.