Hereditary

Went to Girls School Cinema in East Perth to see Hereditary on Sunday night. I had missed it at the mainstream movies but I’d heard it should be seen on the big screen if possible.

It’s the story of a family – Annie (Toni Collette), Steve (Gabriel Byrne), their son Peter (Alex Wolff) and daughter Charlie (Milly Shapiro). The death of Annie’s mother begins a series of grisly and disturbing events that leads her to the heart of a generations-old mystery.

I’d psyched myself up, because I had seen the trailer, which made it look like a combination of every fucked-up horror movie you’re ever seen, times 10. Amusingly, if you haven’t heard, at Event Cinemas they mistakenly played it during the previews for Peter Rabbit, totally freaking out a bunch of children and their mums (probably mainly the mums).

And I’d heard from my friend Sigrid, who is intimately acquainted with horror cinema, that it was one of the most disturbing movies she’d ever seen either. So, grimly prepared, I only let out one terrified mewling noise during the entire thing, which I was rather proud of.

The Ministry of course let out muffled snorts of laughter throughout, which we know was only his male pride deciding to view awful things as funny in order to protect himself emotionally. Right?

Because probably what was worst about this movie was its raw depiction of loss and grief and the terrible dynamics that can fester within families. It’s the combination of that with the intense horror scenes that made it so unusually confronting a movie.

All the performances were excellent, particularly Alex Wolff as the guilty, fearful and confused teenager Peter, but Collette was the obvious standout. She should win an Oscar for that performance. Her pain was awful to behold. It just remains to be seen whether an Oscar could go to a performance in a genre film.

It should! This is a smart genre film, with a dense plot. I’ve decided the use of the miniatures Collette’s character is crafting is just to keep you guessing and kind of freaked out by them (alternative theories welcome in the comments). But there were other elements of the storyline that didn’t seem to make sense, or that we thought were maybe just included for gratuitous horror purposes. We had to Google them before going, “ooooohhhhhh” and concluding that yes, it all made sense. It makes a nice change when a movie makes you work for it just a little.

This is required viewing for horror fans and Collette devotees. I fit both categories and so I’m glad I got to see it on the big screen for the full effect. It was an excellent film. But if you’re not in either category, maybe give yourself a break and pick something funny instead.

 

 

 

 

 

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Simon Baker’s Breath, and Perth’s latest pop-up cinema – no summer required!

It’s like the universe heard me bitching publicly about how there wasn’t a cinema in Perth city. It has now indignantly dropped one on my doorstep, 700 metres from my house.

The Girls School Cinema is run by the same lot who run the Rooftop movies in Northbridge each summer, and I can’t tell them how grateful I am that the penny has dropped and Perth is now providing a pop up cinema experience in winter. It’s small, colourful, comfortable and it’s on until September 29.

I was thrilled to see Breath on there as I’d missed its run at the big movies.

We didn’t know it yet, but we’d already imagined ourselves into a different life.

Tim Winton released Breath in 2008, a coming-of-age novel about two teenage boys from a country town in southern WA, about their discovery of and obsession with surfing and their relationship with their mysterious surfing guru Sando. They all grow close, and then one of the boys, Pikelet, has an affair with Sando’s wife while he is away on a surfing trip.

It’s a deceptively quiet storyline, in which everything is happening below the surface. And yet it’s quite a long movie, and even more impressively it doesn’t drag. Simon Baker (from The Mentalist) makes an impressive directorial debut, pulling you on with quiet force and a constant undertow of tension. Tim Winton himself provides the voice of the narrator. Baker is also starring as Sando, and is pitch-perfect as the laid-back, yet intense man anxious that the boys understand and respect the magic of becoming one with the water, and pushing them to take risks that will change their relationships with themselves and with each other.

His costars, the boys Pikelet and Loonie (played by newcomers Samson Coulter, of Manly, and Ben Spence, of Margaret River) gave revelatory performances, and The Great Gatsby’s Elizabeth Debicki was spot on as Sando’s angry and troubled wife Eva, a woman living like a trapped animal after injury derailed her own daredevil sporting career.

Filmed in Denmark, it showcased the wild and lonely surf, cliffs and forests of southern WA as though they were part of the cast; appropriate for the works of Winton, in which landscape is always integral. It was positively soaked with moody colours and heaving dark-blue seas and sunkissed, loose-limbed youth. It was one of those films so lovely it makes you ache inside, sad and happy simultaneously and full of a nameless longing. So beautiful I forgot my Australian cultural cringe, and just felt proud to live in such a place and grateful someone had the skill to bring its beauty alive.

Breath is available on iTunes here

More on Girls School Cinema here.